Wednesday, August 16, 2006

Pardoning Executed Soldiers

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There are many soldiers with perfect military training. However, like ordinary people, they ‎prefer to live in peace. Others feel boredom because of remaining confined to their ‎military barracks with no battle to wage, where they can show their heroism. Prior to ‎British military involvement in troubled countries, especially Iraq and Afghanistan, ‎many British pilots felt bored because there was no fight to make.‎

But there are other soldiers who object to go into war on moral grounds. These are ‎conscientious objectors. There were cases in Israeli army where some soldiers refused ‎to act in Gaza or the West Bank during Palestinian Intifada or uprising. ‎

It remains problematic that a soldier refuses to be in action. If the whole army is of the ‎same opinion, the country remains defenceless. Soldiers are trained to obey orders, ‎and to sacrifice their lives for their country. Deserting the army is a treason, which ‎means unpardonable.‎

But talking about pardon, there were cases of national reconciliation as in South ‎Africa after the end of apartheid or Argentina after the end of dictatorship. Many ‎alleged abusers were not brought to trial. Very few were tried.‎

So talking about pardoning dead soldiers for refusing to carry their military duty ‎should be equated with those who committed national atrocities. If it is in the national ‎interest of many countries to turn a new page and let the past buried, the same should ‎apply for prosecuted soldiers, at least for the honour of their families. They should ‎enjoy pardon as long as they were not involved in national treason, crime against humanity or their motive was ‎groundless.‎

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