Monday, September 04, 2006

Threat of Scientists Shortage in UK


Among the reasons why many rich and industrialised countries are threatened with a falling number of future scientists is the falling birth rate and the falling academic achievements at school.
Today young students in rich countries are faced with too many distractions thanks to the affluence of their societies. This makes it possible for them to spend time enjoying themselves rather than concentrating on their studies. Teachers no longer command the same authority they used to have as there are disciplinary problems.

The computer paradoxically contributes to students’ laziness. They can perform many operations by using, for example, a calculating machine rather than mental calculations or a pen and a paper as it used to be the case in the past.

Rich countries at least have the means to find more scientists. They can offer incentives to highly qualified people from the third world like the Asians who are known to be good at mathematics.
Some years ago, Germany was in need of sixty thousand engineers in information technology.It put its preference on Pakistanis and Indians.

All in all, to prepare future scientists, students should be sensitised that life is easy for them thanks to scientific discoveries and achievements. But future generations should take the lead before there will be shortage of people skilled in jobs needing mathematical excellence.

2 comments:

Political Teenager said...

Personally i hated doing science at school, i alwyas prefered the humanities such as politics or geography.

Abdelilah Boukili said...

Just like you. When a student, I considered science a dry subject. My option was for humanities. I was particularly interested in literature, politics and history. My passion for these three hasn't dried.

Thank you for your comment. I hope to see you having become a renowned author of your preferred areas of humanities.