Thursday, December 14, 2006

Male Circumcision 'Cuts' HIV Risk

A recent search has found out that male circumcision 'cuts' HIV risk. Any means to stop HIV AIDS is good to follow. Chemotherapy and herbal medicines have so far failed to stop the spread of AIDS. A vaccine is long, if not impossible to get, to make AIDS a history.

Circumcision can be a new light of hope at least to minimise the risk of AIDS. It is cheaper to carry out than pharmaceutical medicines, which remain too expensive for the affected in poor countries, mainly in Africa.

But the problem with this method can be in societies where circumcision is never practiced and which some men may see as an attack on their masculinity. The question remains if there can be successful campaigns in other parts of the world to make circumcision a healing standard method and if those at risk from it will accept it.

The test was carried on a limited population where circumcision is customary. In many regions of Africa, circumcision is a tradition. If we count the number of Jews and Muslims there are more than 600 million circumcised males. It will be interesting to know the rate of AIDS among such a population before giving a final judgement. If Jews and Muslims have the lowest rate because of circumcision (and sexual conduct), then the latest research should be held as valid. In this case, circumcision should be generalised on the basis if a patient accepts the removal of an organ, limb or teeth to feel better, circumcision should be seen as a better way for prevention.

After all medical circumcision, if it can be called so, is about just the removal of a tiny part of the skin to save the rest of the body from a deadly and overwhelming infection

1 comment:

fa said...

Well since the foreskin comprises about half the surface area of the penis, and the most sensitive half at that, I don't think it can be a 'tiny bit of skin'. The vast majority of Europeans (including UK residents) are intact. See and my blog